Episode #32: The Power of Being a Feminine Entrepreneur with Maricruz Carrillo

Written by: Karenna Soto
The Fully Expressed Podcast
The Fully Expressed Podcast
Episode #32: The Power of Being a Feminine Entrepreneur with Maricruz Carrillo
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Ever wondered how speaking two languages influences your perspective and identity? In this episode, I’m thrilled to welcome Maricruz Carrillo, a dynamic entrepreneur with a rich cultural background. Born in Rosarito, Mexico, and now thriving in San Diego, Maricruz embodies the journey of a bilingual and bicultural individual navigating two worlds. We delve into her experiences as the co-founder of Sun Mud and the founder of Menos Waste, highlighting her commitment to sustainability and her passion for the environment.

Maricruz shares the challenges and triumphs of living a transborder life, the impact of language on identity, and how embracing her Mexican heritage has been pivotal in her personal and professional growth. This episode is an invitation to explore the depths of your own identity, understand the power of language, and embrace the unique perspectives that come from straddling two cultures.

You can read the full podcast transcript for this episode below:

0:00
Welcome to the fully expressed podcast with Karenna.
0:02
I am your podcast host, Karenna Soto.
0:05
And this is a show where we have different conversations that invite you to living a life fully expressed and creating relationships that are fully expressed and creating a business where you feel fully expressed.
0:14
So, truly bring being your most authentic self to all of the areas in your life and what that looks like.
0:20
And so today, we have a really special guest and so excited because I just met her name is Maricruz and Maricruz that I met at a networking event here in San Diego in a previous podcast.
0:32
We’ve actually had her.
0:33
But Marta Giri, who I taught her on this podcast, she was on this podcast and she is the editor and co editing in chief and owner of the locally well podcast as well here and Wellness podcast here in San Diego.
0:46
But she also has created such a wonderful way of networking with others.
0:50
She has truly like wrapped her arms around the wellness community.
0:54
And at one of those events that Marta Giri put together, I met Maricruz and we were just talking and connecting.
1:01
And then she shared her story at the event and I was like, oh my gosh, I really love her.
1:06
She is a founder and the owner of a couple companies, which I will let her talk about that.
1:12
But with that being said, I’m going to pass it over to her and let her introduce herself.
1:17
Hi.
1:18
Yeah.
1:19
Hi.
1:19
Thank you for having me.
1:20
I’m so excited.
1:21
I feel like we’re getting to know each other through this podcast and then also just letting everyone else kind of get to know me as well.
1:29
So like you mentioned, my name is Maricruz.
1:32
Maricruz Carrillo.
1:33
I was born in Rosarito Mexico, but I’ve been in San Diego since I was 10.
1:38
So since fifth grade and I am the co founder of a company called Sun Mud, which we do sustainable sunscreen.
1:46
And then I’m also the founder of Menos Waste for Menos Waste.
1:50
I help small businesses transition to a more sustainable space and I do that through workshops, one on ones and also have a youtube channel which I always like to plug in.
2:01
I am really passionate about the environment.
2:05
I am also an engineer and I’m also an entrepreneur obviously.
2:08
So I am really excited because I have pretty interesting story.
2:11
So excited to dive in.
2:13
Yeah.
2:13
Thank you so much for being here and you can just tell that you have so much to offer based on what you just told us I really want to dig into, you said that you’ve been going to school here in the United States since, since you were 10?
2:26
Mhm.
2:26
Ok.
2:26
Can you tell I would love to hear a little bit more about that story.
2:29
So when I heard this, I was like, oh, we need to dive into this some more.
2:32
So what does that mean?
2:33
What does that look like?
2:34
Yeah.
2:34
So it was a really interesting journey.
2:37
I was born in Rosarito and I lived there my whole childhood.
2:40
I actually like to say that I had the perfect childhood.
2:43
We lived by the beach.
2:45
I went to private school, you know, I had a nanny.
2:47
I I was living my best life for the 1st 10 years of my life.
2:52
But unfortunately, things started getting a little bit dangerous in Tijuana Rosarito.
2:58
So my dad actually decided to sell our childhood home, which was so sad, but hopefully one day I can buy it back, but he decided to sell everything and move to the US just for safety.
3:12
And that was a huge culture shock for me because I mean, I grew up in Mexico being Mexican, you know, speaking Spanish and just without a care in the world, right?
3:23
And then I went to out of all places, we decided to move to Jund in East County San Diego.
3:30
So my school was 99% white, right?
3:32
So then I went from being Mexican among Mexicans to now being am minority, which was a complete new concept for me.
3:40
Had no idea.
3:41
You know, I was in fifth grade.
3:43
I didn’t really know English that well.
3:45
So I was in the English second language classes and that’s where pretty much all the other Mexicans were in, in the school.
3:54
So I was able to build bonds with them.
3:56
But it was really weird to me and I immediately started adapting, right?
4:02
Like most immigrant families do where I was like, OK, what do I know about school in us?
4:07
And obviously it was the movies, you know, TV, shows.
4:11
So I started adapting and saying, ok, well, I want to be the cool girl obviously.
4:16
And like that was always the cheerleader, right?
4:18
I started doing things like that.
4:20
Like I joined the cheer team, I immediately left the ESL or English second language classes as soon as I could because I just wanted to be in the regular class, things like that.
4:31
I wanted to ride the school bus because that was a being in the movies, little things and I started adapting and right when I was almost, I felt like home again.
4:42
We had to move back to Mexico.
4:44
We couldn’t afford the life in the US, unfortunately.
4:48
And so we moved back to Rosarito and that’s when my life of being a transborder student began.
4:55
So I would live in Rosarito, but then still travel because I needed to finish school here.
5:00
And so this would look like maybe waking up at 3 a.m. from Rosarito having breakfast, driving, crossing an international border which was so volatile.
5:10
Sometimes it was an hour, sometimes it was 3.5 and so kind of gauging that getting to school a little early, having to nap in the car if we got there early or being late very often.
5:22
Right.
5:23
You know what that looked like for about seven years until I was in sophomore year of university.
5:31
So that was kind of wild.
5:33
But I have been in school here since fifth grade and then now last year I finished my phd.
5:40
So it was a long time.
5:43
But yeah, it was kind of interesting that I actually wasn’t the only one doing that.
5:48
Right.
5:48
I had friends in the bus that were also crossing the border every day and it’s kind of almost normal here in Tijuana to do that, which is wild to me.
5:59
Now, now that I’m a little bit of an adult, you know, I’m like, wow, I did that.
6:04
You did.
6:06
Yeah, you did do that.
6:07
So for those that don’t know or maybe listening on the other because I know there’s people all over the world that listen to it sometimes too.
6:12
It’s like TJ Tijuana is like on the border of San Diego.
6:15
So it’s like San Diego to cross the border into Tijuana, Mexico and it’s such a close thing.
6:22
And even for me like someone who grew up in California, like, or even here in San Diego, it’s so easy to go and be between the two.
6:29
Right?
6:29
It’s not like huge thing.
6:30
It’s like you just drive through the border and then you come right back and it sounds like you made that like your life.
6:36
Like you, your dad really wanted something better for you and brought you to the US and then you had to go back.
6:41
And so you were doing both Dally life.
6:43
I’m so curious, going back to that little part of you that was living here, living in at the time that you’re living here and you started going to school.
6:52
Did you, do you resist the change?
6:54
You said that you adapted really well, but did you resist it at all or were you like, really open to just starting to do a lot with like Americans did?
7:02
Right?
7:03
Yeah, that’s an interesting question.
7:05
And actually I feel like I haven’t thought about that, but I definitely was more on the side of not resisting.
7:11
I’m just in general a very adaptable person and I think maybe life has made me that way also, I’m a Gemini.
7:18
So I kind of like Morph into whatever I need to morph into.
7:23
So like I mentioned, I started adapting to it, like, you know, speaking English as much as I could becoming a cheerleader, all of these things that were American, right?
7:34
I feel like I even started eating a certain way.
7:37
Right.
7:38
Just to try to fit in and make the change.
7:41
Not as abrupt, I guess.
7:43
I try to make it better for myself.
7:46
Yeah.
7:46
It seems like you were more open and curious and leaning into, versus resisting it.
7:51
And it’s interesting because on the podcast recently, we’ve talked a lot about the, the need to belong, like, you know, as human beings.
7:58
Like, we have such a deep desire to, to belong and to be a part of communities and we wanna be accepted and we want to be like the others.
8:05
We wanna be like, wait, you’re doing this thing.
8:07
I wanna do this thing too because it helps us feel connected to one another versus further apart.
8:12
And it sounds like you naturally were more open to adapting to the differences.
8:18
Yes, for sure.
8:20
Although I will say obviously, I felt comfortable with my community as well.
8:24
So, you know, the 10 Mexicans that were in the school I was very good friends with and two of them are still my best friend, my best friends today.
8:34
And it’s the most beautiful friendships that I have probably because we were bonding on that level of like, yeah, experiencing this school together.
8:44
So, I it’s not like I abandoned, you know, my Mexican culture for a little bit, but I definitely tried to adapt to the American culture as much as I could.
8:55
It sounds like, and I want to divide that a little bit more like, you know, you said you were a little bit of gemini.
8:59
So you’re kind of ok with like almost like chameleon, like in and adapting.
9:04
But how did you get to a place now in your life?
9:08
Like truly finding like who you were in that, like that split identity.
9:11
It’s almost like you were living two different worlds.
9:14
You were very open and flexible and living to both worlds.
9:17
But how did you find yourself through that?
9:19
Yeah, it’s been, I mean, that’s a very deep question.
9:23
It’s been quite a journey, especially, it seems like I’ve put myself situations that are uncomfortable throughout my whole life.
9:31
As in like, you know, I could have picked any major, I decided to go with mechanical engineering.
9:37
Right.
9:38
I could have just gotten my bachelor’s degree, got to work and decided to go for my phd and like all these things of, like, I could have made it a lot easier on myself, but I think it’s just kind of my, yeah, my personality of trying to adapt and trying to, like, find fun in the challenge.
9:59
If that makes sense.
10:00
I still feel certain times like a little bit like the imposter in these environments, especially in engineering where even though I have a phd in mechanical engineering, I’m still like, oh, at work, you know, when I’m at work I’m like, maybe I don’t know what I’m doing, you know, or like, maybe I’m not supposed to be here because I’m the only Latina in the whole building, right?
10:22
And it’s like I’m still kind of working through that, but I definitely feel more empowered to fully be myself because of the experiences that I’ve had.
10:35
Like, I feel like I know how to navigate it if that makes sense because of that initial experience of having to do that.
10:42
Yeah, if you’re open to sharing, like, what does the impostor syndrome look like?
10:46
This would be so helpful for anyone that’s listening because I think as we’re stepping into really owning ourselves and putting us in rooms that we felt called to, like you said, it’s like, oh, should I be in this room?
10:56
What do you mean like, like this feels a little stretchy but I wanna be in this room like but am I OK to be in this room?
11:03
Do know enough to be in this room?
11:04
So what does that look like for you?
11:05
Yeah.
11:06
And actually I want to correct myself and I think there’s a change now of instead of calling in an impostor syndrome is an imposter imposter phenomenon because it’s not a syndrome like there’s nothing wrong with you.
11:19
It’s usually has actually nothing to do with you.
11:22
It’s your environment that you’re in.
11:24
So basically, in case nobody has heard of it before, this imposter phenomena basically is this feeling of not being in the right place and kind of faking belonging.
11:36
If that makes sense.
11:37
And usually it happens when the environment is not very inviting or maybe there’s not a lot of people that look like you or share your similar experience in, in a space.
11:47
So obviously, being woman of color in mechanical engineering, I’ve felt that throughout my whole educational career and it really goes into your deep, deep childhood traumas, right, that you have to kind of work through.
12:05
And it’s if you are feeling it, like, don’t feel bad because I feel like that’s, it’s almost like extra work that we have to do, right?
12:13
If we’re putting ourselves in those spaces and it’s, it really is a, is a deep psychological work, right?
12:21
So if I’m sitting in a room with 10 white men and we’re talking about a problem or a project that I’m working on and then they keep kind of saying little things kind of negating what I’m saying or, or ignoring or something like that.
12:36
And I get really frustrated, you know, and I have to go back and think, ok, why am I so frustrated?
12:44
And where is that coming from?
12:46
Right.
12:46
Like, obviously somebody might say from the outside, but obviously you’re frustrated because they’re ignoring you and all these things.
12:52
But then if I really meditate on it, I’m like, well, I remember that one time, you know, in sixth grade where my math teacher who was a white man did this and like, made me feel little and all these things and like, oh, that’s where it’s coming from, right?
13:08
And so kind of unpacking that can allow me to like, ok, maybe they’re not attacking me currently.
13:16
That’s just coming from a previous experience.
13:19
So the next time I walk into that room, I can maybe come with a little more confidence of like, ok, they’re not attacking me, you know, that was just my mind kind of reliving that and then I can more confidently speak up, speak up, right?
13:32
And like, say like, no, actually, I do think I’m right because this is this, this, this, you know, so it’s a lot deeper than just saying like, oh, you know, whatever, just brush it off and come back to the next meeting.
13:45
So it is a lot of work.
13:47
Oh, it is so much work and you just talked about it like it’s so, but a lot of people, a lot of people, I think sometimes do that where like they do brush it off and they’re like, I just got to be more confident.
13:58
I just got to speak up, you know, but it sounds like you’re taking more of the route of actually being with yourself in that experience and getting really, really curious to, well, where is this actually coming from?
14:08
And you’re witnessing the fact that it’s becoming your perception in that situation and it’s an opportunity for you to like work through that, which I’m so grateful that you walked all of us through that because it’s, it is, that’s the level of work I would say it takes to not only show up differently externally, but also show up differently internally.
14:28
Yes.
14:28
Which at the end of the day, like we’re all, yes, we all have this external experience.
14:33
But I think the most internal experience that we’re having is the most present, right?
14:37
We’re the ones living with our thoughts.
14:39
We’re the ones living with the frustration.
14:40
We’re the ones living with the anxiety or the heaviness and you’re willing to do that work of like, OK, what is my internal experience happening?
14:49
Where is that coming from?
14:50
And then how can I be with that part of me?
14:51
So I feel more confident.
14:53
So I feel more safe in these situations to believe my, to believe my thought, right?
14:58
To get curious and be lean into what I truly believe in, which is like your most authentic self there, right?
15:05
And then one thing that I wanna add is that sometimes I get stuck in this like mindset of like, well, it’s wrong like they made me feel this way and it’s wrong.
15:16
But honestly, those 10 white men that were in the room are not thinking about it at all.
15:21
That’s what kind of drives me crazy sometimes is like, I’m over here overthinking everything and like not being able to sleep maybe or something like that.
15:29
And they literally have no idea, you know, that I’m going through all of this.
15:34
And so that’s just showing you that you can’t control anybody else.
15:37
Right.
15:37
So, controlling how I react is the, is the only thing that I can do unless I go and tell them like, hey, you’re being mean, you know, or something, it’s not going to change anything.
15:50
That’s, that’s all.
15:51
Yeah, I think, I mean, you’re so right.
15:53
And I love that.
15:54
You said that because it’s so true.
15:56
You know, like people really don’t know how you feeling.
16:00
They’re not mind readers.
16:01
And unless someone that’s intentionally being manipulative or like has like narcissistic tendencies or is gaslighting you.
16:09
And I also think that to an extent, sometimes people don’t even realize that they’re doing that because they’re not aware of themselves, but that doesn’t necessarily give them permission either.
16:18
Like to your point, like there’s a lot of the work that we can do on our end and be like, how can I manage and be with my experience?
16:24
And it, and then I also think that if it does get to a place where someone is being disrespectful, like I’m like leading to those hard conversations and be like, hey, I, you may or may not realize that what you said made me feel this way, but this is how I do feel.
16:36
Can I I don’t appreciate you talking to me that way or right?
16:39
Love if you ask me more questions about this versus assuming because then there’s like those internal conflicts but, and it’s actually you closer together in relationship.
16:49
But to your point at the end of the day, they are not aware of how something makes you feel unless you tell them.
16:55
And to some extent, there is some work that we can do on our end is that fair.
16:59
And by doing the work on our end, then we can more confidently come back and be like, hey, this is how that made me feel.
17:07
I would suggest not doing that again, you know, totally because you’re working through your emotional response, right?
17:13
Because our emotions are, I always think of it this way.
17:16
Like it’s like if you can navigate how you’re feeling and like be with your emotions and allow them to move in the way that they need to move, then you can get way more clear on how to show up in that experience.
17:27
Sometimes like, like you said, this is such a great example because like you got triggered and you realize, oh, it’s my 10 year old teacher English teacher that did this to me.
17:36
But that whole all of your life, you felt those things.
17:39
And so there’s like all of this history that your body is experiencing, you have to work through that.
17:44
So then you get more clear to be like, ok, what’s actually happening in the present moment?
17:48
How do I navigate what’s happening today?
17:51
Not what’s happening to me?
17:52
10 years ago, our body thinks that it’s what’s happening 10 years ago.
17:56
Yes.
17:57
Life hack or you coming to, you go put yourself in a room, invest in a community that puts and creates spaces that you feel seen and hurt.
18:09
So if you have access to investing into communities or finding rooms or groups of people by taking classes, going to work classes, meditation classes, sound about classes, whatever you’re kind of craving, maybe dance classes, whatever that looks for you, invest your time connection is everything.
18:32
This is a huge life hack.
18:34
We need to be in rooms that are in the energies that we want to be in and what we want to step into.
18:39
And here’s a little pro tip.
18:41
If you live in a city where you do not have access to these types of communities, create your own, start hosting your own monthly dinner or girls hang out and ask and see if there’s a few people that want to get together that you feel like are in a line in the journey that you’re at and create those spaces and talk about the things you want to do.
19:02
I promise you you’re going to start to feel way more, seen, way more inspired, way more encouraged in those spaces because it is constantly feeding back into your system.
19:13
I would love to know as we like to start talking a little bit more about like your businesses.
19:18
What inspired you to open up your businesses like, and how do you navigate all of these things in a similar way?
19:25
But in the rooms that you’re creating for yourself.
19:28
And I love that question because in speaking about this imposter phenomena, I feel like in entrepreneurship is where I felt at least.
19:37
And I think it is because I’m building my own things, right?
19:42
I’m building my own businesses based on my values based on my rules.
19:46
And it feels very like personal and very like their mind.
19:51
So I feel like the owner of, you know, my business is obviously you are the owner, I’m the owner.
19:59
So it’s not so much about like, oh, am I not supposed to be doing this because I chose to do it?
20:04
And I, I’m doing so I decided to start my no waste almost five years ago now, maybe six years ago because I felt like I wasn’t doing enough, which in itself is something I have to like, work through, you know, therapy.
20:21
I’m always feeling like I could do more, but I was finishing my grad school and it was in engineering and I felt like I wasn’t doing enough for the community as a whole and for the planet.
20:34
So I decided to start this business to kind of, you know, do a little more and put in my little grain of salt, you could say into this huge problem, environmental problem that we have, right?
20:45
And it started off as making natural products actually.
20:48
So it wasn’t a consulting business at all.
20:51
It was more like I was making deodorant toothpaste and like things like that, but more sustainably.
20:57
And I really felt like that allowed me to connect with my community because then I would talk about all of the environmental aspects of your personal care through my products, right?
21:08
And through my Instagram and started growing my Instagram community as well, putting tips and things of living a more sustainable lifestyle.
21:17
And then I just started learning and learning and learning and learning.
21:19
So once I gathered all this knowledge, people started going to me for advice, right?
21:27
They’re like, hey, I want to start a business too.
21:29
Like, how did you go about this?
21:31
How did you go about that?
21:32
And then I was like, oh, I would love to tell you and that was like, really when I lit up, right?
21:37
I was like, oh, let’s sit down for a coffee and we’ll lay it all out for you.
21:42
And so I started noticing that I was like, you know what I really enjoy this and I really saw a need, especially in my community, my Latino community because I noticed that there was a lot of businesses that were doing sustainable things but not really capital on them or noticing.
22:01
So I was like, this could really be something where I can help my community kind of like access that space of sustainability.
22:08
It’s such a big word, right?
22:10
Sustainability and a lot of people just think of like eco friendly products, right?
22:15
But yeah, so what does that mean?
22:16
It’s so much more so menos waste actually stands on four pillars.
22:21
It’s environmental, financial, social and cultural sustainability.
22:26
That fourth one is actually a menos waste exclusive.
22:29
I have never heard somebody include that in holistic sustainability.
22:35
But it’s basically kind of saying that these four things have to work together and have to be in balance in, in order to have a successful business, right?
22:42
You could lean maybe too much into the environmental sustainability and then you start feeling it in the financial sustainability side, right?
22:51
Or maybe you’re focusing too much on the finances and you start losing a little bit of the social sustainability of like maybe getting really cheaply made parts or something from like not so many good sources, right?
23:05
So balancing those four and the cultural one is really special to me because I really felt it with menos waste where sustained felt very different than what I was.
23:18
If that makes sense, it probably doesn’t make sense, but it was very whitewashed in when I first entered it, right?
23:24
If you look at in youtube like sustainable lifestyle, it was only white women, only white women in Canada or Australia or England.
23:33
And then I was just like, ok, so like it was, it was really different to find myself in that space.
23:40
So I started feeling like, I was deviating from my culture and from my personality trying to be more environmentally sustainable.
23:49
And so I was like, this is literally not sustainable because I’m losing myself in this.
23:55
And that’s no way to build a business, right?
23:58
You have to be authentic, you have to be passionate about everything that you’re doing.
24:02
Otherwise you’re going to give up when it gets hard, right?
24:05
So I added that fourth pillar because I really felt myself like losing that, right?
24:10
And I was like, I don’t want anyone else to build a business that makes them lose themselves because literally not sustainable.
24:17
This is so good.
24:19
Can we dive into that some more?
24:21
Because I feel like, you know, when you get into business who get into this place and like, how are other people doing it?
24:27
And you go and find and you go out there and search and you’re like, OK, who’s doing what, what’s doing what?
24:31
And it’s interesting, you see, I don’t want to call them clicks or just like communities, right?
24:36
So like to your point, right?
24:37
Communities and different pockets, like even in business, like yesterday, I went to a conference and I went to the Aspire conference and it was such a beautiful business financial conference and it gave you all the aspects of like business logistics.
24:51
We also talked about like finance and like wealth and investing and all these things.
24:56
But this specific conference like attracts a certain amount of people, but they’re also like a certain and they’re amazing and not necessarily take any away from that.
25:03
I’m just talking to the fact that this conference lives in a specific part of the business community.
25:08
And then you have other business conferences like I got invited to one which is like the business energetics for female entrepreneurs.
25:15
You go to that branding and it’s like all pink and, and black and white and purples and it’s just all about the energetics and the type of woman, the type of business that goes there.
25:25
It’s like all these like spiritual entrepreneurs, right?
25:28
So, and then now you’re talking about this space within a space, within a space, space, you know, you’re talking so much so like the sustainability industry and what is it like to do business and sustainability?
25:39
But then what does it actually look like within those groups?
25:42
And I love the fact that you, you saw yourself.
25:46
You’re like, OK, I’m gonna grow and I want to lean into this and I don’t want to lose myself.
25:51
What was that like part?
25:53
What when did do that?
25:54
Like huge milestone happened when you’re like, no, like I’m losing myself and I need to bring my identity back into this.
26:00
What did that look like?
26:02
I think it was a pretty specific moment when my niece told me, how come you don’t do like content in Spanish?
26:12
And I was like, I actually don’t know, like, I don’t know why.
26:17
And so I was like, you know what, I’m going to make an effort to do in Spanish.
26:20
And actually, if you go farther back in my youtube channel when I started it, like, two years ago and then I stopped, I have my videos both in Spanish and English, but I started noticing, I had no idea how to speak sustainability in Spanish.
26:36
Right?
26:37
And I was like, hm, like, how do you say, I don’t know carbon emissions or carbon neutral, you know, now that I think about it, I’m like, well, it wasn’t that hard, but I just had never used them and I had never learned them and I was like, well, where’s why don’t I know all this in Spanish, right?
26:55
So I was started kind of reflecting on that.
26:58
I’m like, well, all the content that I’m, you know, absorbing, whether it be youtube or articles or conferences or things like that is all in English and it’s all coming from certain people, right?
27:11
And so I was like, well, I need to change that, right?
27:15
Let me diversify my my content sources a little bit.
27:19
And once I started diving into that, I started noticing, you know what, there’s actually so much wisdom in indigenous cultures, in Mexican culture and my alias culture, right?
27:32
Like all these things were like, why am I trying to fit into this other mold of the modern sustainability?
27:40
You could call it when I have so much wisdom within me, like in my ancestors and in just my culture, right?
27:48
Of what already is sustainable.
27:51
So I guess my niece was kind of what triggered it because she doesn’t speak English, right?
27:56
And she’s like, I want to watch your stuff and I want to follow you.
27:59
But, and she was only like seven at this time.
28:02
And she’s like, but I, I don’t understand it.
28:05
And I’m like, oh no, like this is I’m literally building this business for my community and I am not being accessible, I guess to them, right?
28:17
And so that’s kind of what took me down that lane.
28:20
It was a pretty specific moment.
28:22
Yeah, it’s interesting.
28:23
Like I would love to know how, I don’t know if you know this because I think about this too.
28:27
So I’m Peruvian.
28:28
So I also have a Spanish background.
28:30
I speak Spanish fluently, but I was born here in the US and my parents are from Peru.
28:35
And so funny enough, Nick is just got his holistic Practitioner certification, something like that.
28:43
He’s been learning so much about how food is medicine.
28:46
Let’s just talk.
28:47
And he told me that onions are a great medicine to attack histamine or like when you’re sick and things like that, I, I looked at him and I go, oh my gosh, my nanny from Peru used to give me like literally shaved onion like you’d shave the onion and then she put sugar on it and, oh my God, I hated it.
29:04
I, she hated it.
29:05
It was the worst taste ever because she was, like, take a big spoonful every time I got sick and it helps go away and Nick goes, he’s like, holy cow.
29:14
Like, and your grandma and, like, your nanny from, like, I was like, yeah, like, she just knows this from our background, our culture and our ancestor to what you’re talking about.
29:23
And there’s so much wisdom there that he’s learning in school about.
29:27
Yeah, in the US.
29:28
And I’m like, oh I didn’t even think that I grew up with that, you know, like to me, it was just like kind of normal and there’s a lot of things that my mom knows about food, being medicine and these different tools and things like that.
29:39
So it’s so beautiful to hear that you’re doing that and that you have it in your back pocket, you know, were you, you always targeting the Hispanic communities or you were always targeting Hispanic communities?
29:51
So it’s actually in my name, right?
29:54
I have the company is called Menos Waste, soos, meaning less, less waste.
30:00
And I was very intentional about having a Spanish word in it just to make that, that distinction, right?
30:06
Of like, hey, I’m here, I’m Latina.
30:09
I’m doing this right?
30:10
And, and being very outward about being proud of my, of my heritage.
30:16
So I made sure to include that Menos and I also saw a bigger need for those that don’t know what that means.
30:24
What does that mean?
30:24
Menos means less though Menos waste is less waste.
30:30
And I saw a bigger need actually in my community.
30:33
So it was very intentional, especially like trying to reconnect them back to Mother Nature and make them realize that they already are doing sustainable things.
30:44
That was like kind of a wake up moment, I guess when I was like, oh, like this is really a need and I could really help my community at the same time.
30:54
Wow.
30:54
And saying, and what, so let’s talk about your second business.
30:58
So how did you get to a place of opening up sun mud?
31:01
Which by the way, I’m gonna drop a little thing.
31:03
I’ve used it and it’s so good for those who haven’t looked into it.
31:06
I and I love it because it’s a very healthy, sustainable product, not just good for your skin but also good for your, the oceans.
31:14
Am I correct in saying that correct?
31:16
Yeah.
31:17
So sun mud is really interesting because initially because I already had mental waste, I’ve had mental waste for way longer than, than sun mud.
31:25
Sun mud is relatively young.
31:27
I would say we started working on the formula for their sunscreen.
31:32
about three years ago, it took us about two years to develop the formula.
31:38
It was our original formula which not a lot of sunscreen companies can say usually, you know, a lot of them white label stuff or just copy somebody else’s formula.
31:48
But that’s why ours is special and it feels bad.
31:52
I think.
31:53
So.
31:54
I initially started as more of a sustainability consultant for Sun Mud.
32:00
I have two co-founders and I already had mental way.
32:04
So they were like, hey, we’re thinking of doing this and we want it to be the most sustainable sunscreen in the market.
32:10
So I was like, I’m in, you know, and of course, I fell in love with it and then I’m like, OK, I’m going to be a founder as well because I love this product.
32:20
And I really think we have something here.
32:22
So before that I actually was making sunscreen for myself, probably for like seven years.
32:29
I didn’t grow up using sunscreen.
32:31
It’s not really part of a Mexican culture and I was in the sun a lot.
32:36
Like, I definitely should have been wearing sunscreen, but I wasn’t until I began to surf.
32:43
So I’m, I’m a surfer now and I began to really get sunburn out there when I was doing long sessions.
32:49
So I was like, OK, maybe I should look for a sunscreen.
32:52
I couldn’t find anything in the market that I liked.
32:54
So I decided to make my own, having this research background.
32:59
I just researched it myself and I was like, OK, what can I use to, to do do it?
33:04
And I just made a little concoction with zinc oxide and shea butter, I think, and a few oils and was just wearing that.
33:13
But I was looking really goofy out there in the lineup because it was the zinc, right?
33:20
So it was like, it would make me look purple and looked really silly.
33:24
But I didn’t mind because I was just surfing.
33:26
Right?
33:26
But the more research I did, the more I was like, I should use this more on the daily sunscreen is really a thing you should be wearing every day, not just when surfing.
33:36
So I was like, this is not going to work because I’m not going to be walking around with the zinc on my face.
33:41
And at the same time, I was kind of dating my partner now my partner and then I started making sunscreen for him because he’s also a surfer.
33:51
And so he really liked it.
33:53
But again, we had the same issue of like white faced sunscreen, but we started kind of making tweaks to it and trying to play around with it.
34:03
And then really when we decided to or they decided to start a sunscreen company was when his preschool friend was like, hey, I hate all the sunscreen in the market and he’s also a surfer.
34:16
So he’s like, I hate it all.
34:18
Like, I know Maricruz is making her own, like, can I just have some of hers?
34:23
And I was like, sure I’ll make you some, like it’s not the best.
34:27
And then he was like, it’s not the best, but it’s better than anything out there.
34:31
So, if you’re down and start a business and I’m like, wow, ok.
34:36
So it’s the three of us.
34:38
It’s my, my partner and then his preschool friend.
34:41
Right.
34:42
So, it’s really a family business.
34:43
We all, like, trust each other fully.
34:46
And miles is the third co-founder and he was the one that added the clay in there.
34:51
And that’s what I was really like, life changing.
34:54
We’re like, this is the best sunscreen like ever.
34:59
We really need to make this a thing.
35:01
And so we did, that’s kind of a long background story.
35:05
But yeah, so how do you manage all of it?
35:07
How do you manage menos waste, sun mud and life?
35:11
Yeah, we were, we were talking about this before recording that.
35:15
I, if anyone knows human design, I’m a manifesting generator, which means that I have a lot, a lot of energy because there’s, there’s also generators.
35:25
But manifesting generators are like in a different level.
35:28
I just always have to be doing something and I just, I have the energy for it.
35:34
So I also have a 9 to 5.
35:37
So it’s a 9 to 5 and then two businesses became much full time and I like to prioritize my time.
35:45
So I’m one of those people with the Google calendar with like different color coded time blocks for me to work on stuff and that’s kind of how I manage it all by prioritizing.
35:57
I always get asked this question and sometimes people are like, well, you must be so good at managing your time.
36:05
And honestly, I’m not, I’m good at prioritizing my time, which is way different.
36:11
I think it’s not just about making the 24 hours, kind of like using them wisely.
36:16
It’s prioritizing what you spend those 24 hours on.
36:20
That makes sense.
36:21
I still sleep my eight hours at least every night.
36:24
You know, I still like to think I have a good relationship with my partner.
36:28
We, like, make time for that and my family and my friends and surfing, which is like a whole other relationship.
36:36
Yeah, it is.
36:37
Yeah.
36:38
So, yeah, I would say the way I do it is by prioritizing and really like staying true to myself.
36:44
Right?
36:45
Because saying like, oh, I can do all of this and not be healthy, like, not eat good, not sleep.
36:53
Well, all these things like that’s not going to happen.
36:55
Right.
36:56
So I have to be honest with myself and what I commit myself to then I’ve gotten pretty good at it in the last, like, six years.
37:04
Yeah.
37:04
So good.
37:05
Did you ever hear or hit a point of burning out or like, overwhelmed or like, this is too much.
37:10
Yes, I have during my phd.
37:12
But honestly, it was more due to my phd than my businesses.
37:17
It was year two of my PhD program and it was a five year program and I was kind of hitting a wall with my research where it had been months since I had gotten a good result.
37:28
And I was like, what am I doing this for?
37:31
And then I had a really bad experience with the professor and all these things started happening.
37:37
And I’m like, why am I even doing this?
37:39
Like, this is not even getting me to what I want in life.
37:43
That’s what I thought at the time, right?
37:45
And I, I just went into this existential crisis of like, why am I here on this planet?
37:50
Like, who am I here to serve all these things?
37:53
And it wasn’t pointing towards my phd and I realized that all I had to do was take a whole week off.
38:01
I didn’t do anything for a week and it kind of helped me restructure my mind and then I came back and finished it, you know, it was fine, but it was a point of burnout because of more of the emotional side of what are humans here to do.
38:20
Yeah, like more in like asking yourself like the bigger questions, like the bigger questions that are like, well, what am I supposed to be doing?
38:27
What am I really going to do?
38:28
Is this aligned with what I’m doing?
38:30
I know like those moments really come at the best time, you know, but they can be because of a compound effect, right?
38:37
Like you’re, you’re emotionally drained, you’re physically drained, you’re spiritually drained.
38:41
And then all of a sudden these big questions come up and you’re like, now I have to answer these big questions.
38:45
What do you mean?
38:46
Because I’m like, already putting so much energy out there.
38:49
And I think they just, the fact that you talked about prioritizing is so big in business.
38:55
Like I, I also have my 9 to 5.
38:57
I, I also have my life, I’m actually a projector.
39:00
So I do not have any kind of energy that you do not to the level that you do.
39:04
But I have learned to prioritize my time, you know, and like really honor my capacity.
39:10
And for me, it has been so much more like, ok, if I’m honoring my capacity in my day to day, what is my capacity there for?
39:17
So like I have 50% battery today, what are the most important tasks that I need to get done with that 50% battery?
39:23
And that’s how I execute versus thinking I have to do it all, you know, and like in the, I had to do it all or what’s like that, that’s where I think we get caught up sometimes.
39:32
But I really had to get clear on like, ok, what are my five things that I have to do every single day?
39:37
How do I move the needle, my business, not do it all?
39:40
Like not get overwhelmed by every task, but which task needs to get done today.
39:44
And I got forced to doing that because like for you, you might have 100% battery all the time or more because as a man, you know, sometimes or as a Manny gen, you know, you also spike in energy for my understanding.
39:57
So and for those that don’t know, human design go to take your human design because it’s such a beautiful way to understand your energy profiles, like an energy blueprint if you will, right?
40:05
I think that’s the best way to describe it.
40:07
There’s four different signs, there’s the projector, the manage generator and collector and each of those different buckets have different ways to manage their energy.
40:17
There’s different things that make them feel really good back to what I was saying, you know, as a projector, I had to like really get really clear.
40:23
I’m like, OK, I don’t have that much energy.
40:26
So what can I prioritize with the energy that I do have and push through without burning myself out?
40:30
Because that is not going to be supportive because then I’m like in the stucking a spiral versus like, OK, if I can execute what is necessary with the energy that I do have, that feels really, really good versus not getting anything at all because I’m overwhelmed with the fact that I have to do a lot, you know, and I, I might be opening up a can of worms here.
40:50
But being a woman business owner completely changes the game as well because your energy, like I can’t speak for this, like on this for hours, but your energy is not constant throughout your monthly cycle.
41:08
I like to call it your lunar cycle because we’re in sync with the moon, right?
41:13
That’s again, probably a whole other episode.
41:16
But we’re not.
41:19
Yeah, let’s do it.
41:20
We’re not the same when we are menstruating than when we’re ovulating, right?
41:25
Like right now it’s a full moon which means I have the most energy and I’m probably ovulating next in the next couple of days.
41:34
So that really allows me to do it.
41:38
All right.
41:39
Right now, I’m in my superwoman phase of like, yes, I can do all the by two business, all the to do list all of this and clean my house and eat healthy and cook for the whole week and all these things.
41:50
But catch me in two weeks and I’ll be on the couch ordering, take out maybe, you know, and like not doing anything but understanding where you’re at.
42:00
Like I love that.
42:01
You said I’m at 50% today and that’s totally fine because as an entrepreneur at the end of the day, you’re your own boss, right?
42:09
You have nobody to report to and yes, you want to grow your, your business.
42:13
But you know, be nice to yourself if you’re like, hey, boss, can I like do 50% today and you’re the boss.
42:21
So you didn’t just say yes, you know, and like give yourself that opportunity to, to rest.
42:26
Amen.
42:27
I’ve talked about that before and I love that and like for anyone that’s listening, so she’s on fire today and I am deep in my moon.
42:34
So I am deleting and low energy.
42:37
But as an example like, yeah, I woke up this morning without an alarm.
42:41
I was like, I can’t make anything but a burrito sounds good.
42:45
So I went to Ghana and I got myself a burrito.
42:47
I laid, I sat by the beach, I walked my dog and I came home and napped for three hours.
42:51
And now I’m doing this podcast because I knew that the energy that I did have was what I wanted to bring to the podcast.
42:56
This is like I could have woken up and gone hard on myself and been like, OK, what else can I do before the podcast?
43:02
And that before would have stretched me too much versus, I’m like, OK, how much do I have?
43:08
And where do I want to put it?
43:09
And to me was this podcast recording with you.
43:12
And, but that’s just a way of honoring like our different types of where we’re at in women and learning about hormone cycles.
43:19
Oh my God.
43:19
That is, it has been the biggest game tutor.
43:22
So it’s so funny, you know, you can have human design, you could have our hormonal cycles or like to your point, you know, lunar cycles and like using that as a tool to meet you where you’re at.
43:33
And also use as a way to like, not put pressure on yourself because we aren’t meant to go at 100 and 20 percent or 100% all the time.
43:41
Right?
43:41
We need rest.
43:42
Rest is productive, taking care of ourselves are really good.
43:45
And as a woman, you know, we almost have that like built into our system automatically.
43:50
It’s like, hey, go run your, your marathon for the first two weeks and then I’m going to be a rest after that.
43:56
And I’m going to prepare you to go run that marathon again and like, do what you really want to do.
44:00
It’s like it’s our bodies are working for us, not against us.
44:04
They’re like preparing us and being like, hey, this is the most sustainable way to live and it’s literally biologically built into us.
44:11
So how lucky are we?
44:13
Like, I always cringe when people are like, oh, I have my period.
44:18
Like I hate this and like, I hate being a woman and I’m like, no, no, no, no.
44:23
Like we’re so lucky we have this ability to built into us.
44:28
Like you said, to recognize when we have to rest and when we have to go, go, go, right.
44:34
And we’re so much more powerful when we do rest.
44:38
When it is that marathon running time, we’re so much more powerful than, like, not to put them down.
44:44
But then men, right.
44:45
Like, we’re just, we’re built to be powerful.
44:49
Yeah.
44:49
There was something that, I don’t know if you know this, but back in, like, old tribes or old cultures and I don’t know exactly which ones but they would use, they would look to women as the white, this one and actually, like every time that they were on her moon and she was bleeding and they were like, all right, she’s going to go inward.
45:06
And so all the women because traditionally, as anyone knows, like maybe you guys end up syncing up with each other.
45:11
But like what you said, like most of us are bleeding around the moon, like I’m bleeding on the full moon and you’re usually bleed on the new moon.
45:18
And so when you’re in a regulated state, which is a whole another thing right?
45:21
To get your hormones optimized and regulated, like you can kind of track that you’re on the same as the moon.
45:27
But long story short, these like cultures and these tribes would look to women and say, all right, you guys go into your little inner world and go go figure out what’s working and what’s not working for our tribe, for our thing.
45:41
And then they would come out of the out of their bleed once they’re done bleeding and then the follicular phase and be like, all right, so this is what we do, what we need to fix, it’s not working, what is working because as, you know, a lot of the times that our luteal phase or when we’re menstruating, like we’re usually, our periods are usually emotional or things are coming up for you, you’re paying more attention to like what’s not working, what is working, what’s making you frustrated, what’s aligned, what’s not aligned.
46:07
Yeah, it’s so amazing that in old cultures and maybe some still, you know, that are still living in tribes, they look to women as the guide for that and like, all right, you guys are this powerful being like go do your thing that your body is doing and tell us it’s not working and what is working.
46:25
And it’s like, how can we leverage that in our life today as like also using our cycle and our hormone or our cycle as a way to communicate with us and for us to listen to versus to what you are saying, it’s like, it’s not a feeling.
46:41
It’s like, wow, you are.
46:42
There’s so much my body is telling me right now that I get to listen to.
46:46
It’s like it’s communicating with us daily.
46:49
It’s not trying to take you out of the world.
46:51
It’s actually trying to prepare you and set you up for the kind of success that we’re here to do in our life.
46:58
And something super interesting too with indigenous people that they, that they do.
47:04
And they’ve done for centuries is trust women to decide when it’s too much.
47:11
So, an example would be like, the men would go out hunting.
47:16
Right.
47:17
And they would just hunt, hunt, hunt as much as they can.
47:20
And that’s a very male energy.
47:22
Right.
47:22
Like I’m just going to go, go and get as much food as I can.
47:27
And it was the woman’s job to say, ok, now we need to stop like we have enough or like if they’re foraging, it’s like, ok, yeah, there’s a lot of blueberries on the bush, but we don’t eat anymore.
47:38
So now you stop, right?
47:40
So women have always been like the regular regulators in these communities and I feel like that so much in sun mud, my business because my two co-founders are male and so I’m the only female and I’m always the one saying like, they’re like, oh, I’m going to go to 50 stores and get the sun mud in there and everything.
48:02
And I’m like, whoa, whoa, whoa, there’s only three of us in the team, right?
48:05
Are we ready for that growth?
48:07
Like, how can we better prepare to make sure that we’re showing up and we’re being the best, you know, company or like the best partner to these retailers, right?
48:18
And it’s always back and forth of like, ok, we should make more products and I’m like, well, are we all done with the ones that we currently have?
48:27
Like how we gotten those to the potential before we start making something new.
48:31
Like, it’s always interesting because I feel that way, like I’m the regular, it’s interesting in business because I just went to a talk yesterday, it was for Latina entrepreneurs and they were talking about the difference between the female and the male brain.
48:49
Just literally like neurologically how we are built to be entrepreneurs pretty much because our hippocampus is actually larger than men.
49:02
And the hip hippocampus is really in charge of memories and of convictions and which leads to empathy, right?
49:11
And understanding and connecting.
49:13
So we’re literally better connectors, we can empathize a lot better.
49:18
So we’re really good at finding the need with our customer and our clients and all these things.
49:24
But really we live in a male dominated world, right?
49:27
So, and it’s like this balance of like honoring ourselves and our femininity while still trying to make the world a little better.
49:36
That makes sense like putting ourselves in those spaces when it’s the right time.
49:41
You know, because we do need to heal this world.
49:44
And I just think we need more feminine energy in general because of all these things we’re talking about, right?
49:50
Because we have the power we have, we’re closer, I think to nature, we have those moments where that veil between spiritual and the present like physical world is thinner and we just we just magical like that, you know, it’s like I really do think we need more women and entrepreneurship to kind of balance out this highly male dominated world.
50:15
Wow.
50:16
What’s, what a beautiful invitation to like, really owning our feminine?
50:21
Which is, I think even more difficult.
50:23
I don’t know if it’s like the same, you felt this in Mexico, but at least here in the United States, like our culture is primarily masculine energy.
50:29
You know, a lot of us get caught up in that I need to do more now, you know, like I’m not doing enough, which is like a whole thing.
50:35
But you’re talking to so much of just honoring the feminine and like being the feminine energy, which is like more, more flowy, more integrated.
50:43
It’s the one that can see more of a open and curious perspective and kind of like really integrating versus like the masculine is really like the pushing the structure like the forceful, the bold energy.
50:56
And it’s so cool to hear that in your current business today, you are becoming like the balancer in a way you’re like, all right, I’m here for you guys energy and we need it.
51:05
You know, we’re, we’re here for your energy.
51:07
So I think you need both, right?
51:08
I think your point like it’s not an either or situation but will the gift that we have as the feminine like and I love it is like we are bringing in what they cannot see.
51:17
And I do think that more men are starting to see that more often.
51:21
And I’ve never in and for me personally and like the corporate world, most of the times I’ve had men be my allies, they’re the ones kind of like going up to bat for me and like pulling me forward and like helping me grow.
51:33
And so it’s not that, I think there’s a lot of men that are against it.
51:36
I just think they don’t see it the way that we see it.
51:38
And so it’s an opportunity for us to show them.
51:40
It seems like you’re doing the same thing for your current company with the two men that are in your life and your founders because that’s so cool and it’s like such an invitation for the feminine.
51:50
I would love to know what does Mari Mari cos like fully expressed self look like?
51:57
So like as you’re building all of this, like, what’s your, what’s your goal?
52:01
What are you working towards?
52:02
And how are you bringing your fullest self to that?
52:05
Oh That’s a good question.
52:08
That’s funny because I feel like right now how you’re hearing me, how you’re listening to me and how maybe people are receiving me.
52:17
I think that’s my full self right now.
52:20
Before this, you know, I sat down, I did some stretching, I did some breathing and I, you know, I noticed that it is a full moon.
52:29
I noticed my energy was at 100% all these things and I showed up today where I needed to, right?
52:36
I was actually able to do a lot before this podcast because I realized I was at 100%.
52:43
And the my fully expressed self is bringing all of that with me, right?
52:49
Is as, as an engineer.
52:51
It started feeling like that’s who I was, right?
52:55
That was my identity.
52:56
Like when people ask me, like, you know, who are you?
52:59
I would say look, I’m a mechanical engineer, you know, that that was my first answer back in undergrad.
53:05
And I felt like I couldn’t bring all of me to engineering, right?
53:10
I I will never forget when I was in a group for my masters and they asked when I wanted to do the presentation, which I always got put on the presentation because I was the only girl which that’s again another whole episode.
53:26
But and I told them, hey, we should do it, you know, I don’t know April 30th because it’s the full moon and they all looked at me like I was crazy, right?
53:35
They’re like, oh, are you also going to burn some sage?
53:37
You know, like I’m like, yeah, sure, why not?
53:43
But I immediately felt like I couldn’t bring that to that space, right?
53:49
And then just being a full woman, like presenting myself as a woman and all these presentations in front of all male engineers, right?
53:57
Like I had to dress a certain way to mask certain parts of me, right?
54:02
So I think my fully expressed self is showing up fully as the feminine that I am, right?
54:09
Showing up with my herbalist background, with my astrology, showing up with everything and using all of those as tools because that’s really what they are, right?
54:19
Once you learn about all these different things, you can use it to live a more fulfilled life.
54:25
And so showing up to any space with all the parts of me I think is my fully expressed self.
54:32
So that means that 100% yeah, you are 100%.
54:37
You bring 100%.
54:39
But I love that.
54:39
It’s just like you bringing all of you no matter what room you’re in.
54:43
And I think that’s what we all need to remember.
54:45
It’s like, how do you want to dress up, dress up?
54:47
However you wanna say, you wanna say whatever your things are, do it.
54:51
It’s like why not just own that all of that versus like feeling like you have to mask.
54:57
And I think those are just things that we get to navigate on our internal world like I was talking about and then by honoring it internally, like in owning that part of ourselves, eventually the external world gets a lot easier.
55:09
I think we put a lot of pressure on ourselves and we think that the external world is against us.
55:13
But it’s so much more like the world will meet you when you step into your fullest express self, right?
55:19
The rooms will open when you’re like, I want the Medicus, you know, like this is how she is, who is the most authentic.
55:25
And then rooms just start to open up that way.
55:27
You know, your connections start to bring you in in the same direction because you’re bringing all of you versus if you’re constantly kind of like owning maybe 50% of you, the rooms that accept 50% of you are gonna are gonna be there.
55:40
They’re going to be like the constantly in the background and you’re like, wait, I want to be more like this, but it starts with us first and most importantly, you’ll enjoy everything a little more, right?
55:48
My, my two words for this year is joy and ease and I think being fully expressed allows any sort of environment and any sort of scenario or action to be a little more joyful and to be a little easier, right?
56:04
Because you don’t have to think about like, oh you know, is my turtleneck like long enough or like am I covering my butt or like, oh, am I saying something weird because I’m just being myself, right?
56:17
Like it kind of takes a weight off of like, you know what, just be yourself so that you can’t say anything wrong because you’re just being yourself and so everything becomes joyful that that meeting with 10 white men.
56:30
Now all of a sudden is kind of like an experience, right?
56:33
And I’m just going in there and being like, let’s see what happens today, you know.
56:38
Yeah.
56:38
So it really decreases the stress level, I think.
56:42
And it really helps also with that impostor phenomenon at the same time.
56:46
Yes.
56:46
So good.
56:47
I love this.
56:48
I so loved this conversation with you, Maricruz.
56:51
How can this was amazing?
56:53
And I love how you just brought all of you today, which is so cool.
56:57
I think the lines really aligned in that.
56:59
So thank you.
57:00
And if someone wants to follow you continue to get to just like support you celebrate, you learn more from you.
57:06
Where can they find you?
57:07
Thank you.
57:08
You can find me on my website menu unto com.
57:12
I’m also on Instagram.
57:14
We really have a close knit community over there that I love and that’s at underscore Menos Waste underscore.
57:22
So there’s two underscores in there.
57:24
And then I also have a youtube channel, as I mentioned, I started it up again this year.
57:30
So I have a few videos in there and it focuses all on helping you build a small business sustainably.
57:37
And again with the four pillars of sin ability, not just an ecofriendly business.
57:42
And then of course, if you want to support sun mud, I do think we have the best sunscreen.
57:47
So if you want to check it out, that’s sunmudsunscreen.com and I think that’s it.
57:51
Yeah, that’s amazing in touch.
57:54
Yeah.
57:54
Well, thank you so much for being here.
57:56
It was so sweet and yeah, it was just such a great conversation.
58:00
Thank you.
58:01
Yes.
58:01
Thanks for having me.

Episode Highlights:

  • Navigating your identity when you are living two different words and how to integrate them 
  • How to navigate imposter syndrome in real-time 
  • What it looks like to bring all of you to your business and your life, even if it’s not available in the market 
  • The power of the feminine in business and navigating a male-dominated space  
  • How to navigate having a 9 to 5 and owning two business
  • And so much, Maricruz is such a gem and she shared so much of her heart in this episode.

About Maricruz:

Maricruz Carrillo, PhD., is the founder of Menos Waste and SUNMUD. Utilizing sustainability across Environmental, Social, Financial, and Cultural pillars, Maricruz offers coaching and support to small businesses owners, helping them start and grow the business of their dreams!

Connect With Maricruz:

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Karenna Soto

I’m an expert in communication, creating healthy professional and personal relaitonships, and in managing and overcoming anxiety with a knack for navigating difficult conversations both in personal and professional atmospheres. I am here to invite you into your fullest authentic expression and personal evolution.

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More About Karenna

I know how debilitating it can feel to be stuck on the perpetual hamster wheel of a life that you don’t enjoy living. Sure, externally you’ve got it all together, but internally, it likely feels like you’re questioning E V E R Y T H I N G.

Can you relate?

It was when I felt disconnect with what I was doing, and with how I was showing up in my life that I realized the answers lied in how I was doing what I was doing that I decided I no longer wanted to keep living within the box of what I was told to be and decided to boldly express myself and stand for what truly mattered to me.

I have seen the power of fully expressing myself in my personal and professional life. Now I want to bring it to the masses, which is why I’ve created this podcast.

This podcast is my invitation to all people struggling to be fully expressed in life, relationships, and business. It’s for those who are wanting to feel A L I V E, connected, and in love with their life, relationships, and business.

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